About Us
About Us
  • Board Of Directors
  • Collaborators
  • Staff Directory
  • Job Openings
Our Legacy
Our Legacy
  • Achievements
  • History
  • Irene Diamond
  • Photo Gallery
Current Research
Current Research
  • Our Scientists and Labs
    • Paul Bieniasz
    • Cecilia Cheng-Mayer
    • Theodora Hatziioannou
    • David D. Ho
    • Yaoxing Huang
    • Martin Markowitz
    • Moriya Tsuji
  • Core Facilities
    • Personnel
    • Flow Cytometry
    • Microscope Imaging Facility
Clinical Trials
Clinical Trials
  • HIV+
    • Newly Infected With HIV
    • Living With HIV
    • Physicians
    • FAQ's
  • HIV.
    • Healthy Volunteer
    • FAQ's
Focus On HIV
Focus On HIV
  • Facts About HIV and AIDS
  • HIV Biology
    • The HIV Virus Particle
    • The HIV Replication Cycle
Giving Center
Giving Center
  • Online Giving
  • Other Giving Opportunities
  • Financial Summary
News Center
News Center
  • ADARC In The News
  • Seminars
  • Newsletters and Brochures
  • For Journalists
China Aids Initiative
China Aids Initiative
Multimedia Library
Multimedia Library
Talks at ADARC
Talks at ADARC
ADARC Gala
ADARC Gala
  • Gala video
  • Gala photo
  • leadership committee
  • Online Giving
Register for Updates
Register for Updates
Clinical Trails

FAQs


Click on a link below for frequently asked questions about our HIV+ clinical trials:


Frequently Asked Questions: If You Think You Have Been Newly Infected with HIV



How do I know that I am newly infected with HIV?
HIV is transmitted by the transfer of bodily fluids. This can occur during sexual activity or by sharing needles during drug use. There are signs and symptoms that may be associated with new HIV infection.

back to top

What are the signs and symptoms of new a HIV infection?
Most people who contract an HIV infection have some symptoms approximately 2 weeks later. These may include some or all of the following:
  • Fever
  • Muscle aches
  • Rash
  • Joint aches
  • Swollen glands
  • Night sweats
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • Abdominal pain and diarrhea
  • Mouth sores
The symptoms are very non-specific. And some people do not get any symptoms—that is why it is important to test for new HIV infection with blood tests.

back to top

What are the blood tests and where can I get them?
The way to diagnose new HIV infection is with a blood test for the HIV antibody, as well as the HIV virus. These tests can be done by any healthcare provider, but they may not be covered by your insurance. They can also be done here at the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center, free of charge and confidentially.

back to top

Why is it important to know that I am newly infected with HIV?
The Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center studies people with new HIV infection. There are treatment studies that may benefit you. We also have studies which may help understand how the virus and your body interact. This important research may contribute to the development of potentially effective vaccines against HIV. It is also important because you may be very contagious at this stage of infection. Being diagnosed may prevent you from transmitting to other people.

back to top

If I want to come to the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center (ADARC) for testing, what should I do?

You may call Melissa La Mar at 212-327-7280 or e-mail her at mlamar@adarc.org. If you do not get an immediate response, please call Dr. Markowitz at 212-448-5020 or e-mail him at mmarkowitz@adarc.org. In the event that you need to speak to someone urgently, call 646-345-7774. The site for the ADARC Clinical Program is at The Rockefeller University Hospital located on York Avenue and 66th Street in Manhattan. Click here for directions.

back to top

If I come to be seen, what can I expect?
You will be greeted in a quiet and modern facility by a trained staff of professionals. You will be asked to read and sign a consent form to give us permission to talk to you and take blood. Dr. Markowitz or one of his colleagues will meet with you, answer questions, and examine you. You may be asked to bring test results from your healthcare provider or sign a release so your medical records can be obtained. Blood will be drawn to either diagnose new HIV infection or confirm the diagnosis if you have been diagnosed elsewhere.

back to top

Do I have to take medication if I come to ADARC?
No, we are interested in new HIV infection. If you want to participate in a treatment study you will be given a consent form for that study. If you do not want to participate in a specific treatment study you can elect to take medication or not and enroll in our natural history cohort study. Participation is purely voluntary and you may withdraw at any time.

back to top

Will I get free medication if I come to ADARC?
In general, we do not provide free medication unless specified by a particular study. However, if you do not have insurance and are eligible for state drug assistance programs (ADAP), ADARC will provide you with medications over the short term until you can secure the appropriate assistance to obtain medications.

back to top

What studies are being done at ADARC concerning new HIV infection?
There are studies of the transmission of drug resistant HIV, treatment, the natural history of HIV infection, immune events surrounding acute and early HIV infections. Click here to read about current clinical trials for persons newly infected with HIV.

back to top

Frequently Asked Questions: If You Are a Physician and Would Like to Refer a Patient with Acute HIV



If I want to refer a patient to ADARC what should I do?
You may call Melissa La Mar at 212-327-7280 or e-mail her at mlamar@adarc.org. If you do not get an immediate response please call Dr. Markowitz at 212-448-5020 or e-mail him at mmarkowitz@adarc.org. In the event that you need to speak to someone urgently call 646-345-7774. The site for the ADARC Clinical Program is at The Rockefeller University Hospital located on York Avenue and 66th Street in Manhattan. Click here for a link to the hospital with directions etc.

back to top

What can a patient expect to occur on their initial visit to ADARC?
Patients will be greeted in a quiet and modern facility by a trained staff of professionals. At the time of screening, the individual will be asked to read and sign a consent form to give us permission to do a history and physical examination and draw blood. Dr. Markowitz or one of his colleagues will meet with your patient and perform a complete examination. If your patient is already diagnosed, it is best to give him/her the results of the blood tests to bring to the clinic visit. Alternatively the patient will sign a release and results can be sent by fax (212-327-7299). Blood will be drawn to either diagnose new HIV infection or confirm the diagnosis at the time of the screening visit.

back to top

Does ADARC provide primary care for patients?
No, we do not provide primary care. If you want to continue to be the patient’s primary care provider we will work with you directly. This includes transfer of laboratory results and updates on your patient's progress. If you want to refer the patient to a specialist we will work with that healthcare provider.

back to top

What studies are being done at ADARC concerning new HIV infection?

There are studies of the transmission of drug-resistant HIV, treatment, the natural history of HIV infection, and immune events surrounding acute and early HIV infections.

back to top

Contact us:

Melissa La Mar: 212.327.7280
Dr. Markowitz: 212.448.5020 or 646.345.7774
Email: mmarkowitz@adarc.org