About Us
About Us
  • Board Of Directors
  • Collaborators
  • Staff Directory
  • Job Openings
Our Legacy
Our Legacy
  • Achievements
  • History
  • Irene Diamond
  • Photo Gallery
Current Research
Current Research
  • Our Scientists and Labs
    • Paul Bieniasz
    • Cecilia Cheng-Mayer
    • Theodora Hatziioannou
    • David D. Ho
    • Yaoxing Huang
    • Martin Markowitz
    • Moriya Tsuji
    • Xueling Wu
    • Masahiro Yamashita
  • Core Facilities
    • Personnel
    • Flow Cytometry
    • Microscope Imaging Facility
Clinical Trials
Clinical Trials
  • HIV+
    • Newly Infected With HIV
    • Living With HIV
    • Physicians
    • FAQ's
  • HIV.
    • Healthy Volunteer
    • FAQ's
Focus On HIV
Focus On HIV
  • Facts About HIV and AIDS
  • HIV Biology
    • The HIV Virus Particle
    • The HIV Replication Cycle
Giving Center
Giving Center
  • Online Giving
  • Other Giving Opportunities
  • Financial Summary
News Center
News Center
  • ADARC In The News
  • Seminars
  • Newsletters and Brochures
  • For Journalists
China Aids Initiative
China Aids Initiative
Multimedia Library
Multimedia Library
Talks at ADARC
Talks at ADARC
ADARC Gala
ADARC Gala
  • Gala video
  • Gala photo
  • leadership committee
  • Online Giving
Register for Updates
Register for Updates
Current Research

Scientific Overview


Yaoxing Huang
CHOOSE ANOTHER SCIENTIST Drop Down Menu

Yaoxing Huang, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
The aim of our research is the development of effective HIV-1 vaccines, with the potential to prevent infection or assist in controlling already established infection. We are focusing on three areas of HIV-1 vaccine development:

Enhancement of DNA vaccine immunogenicity
Our research in recent years has focused on the design and development of a multigenic subtype C-based DNA vaccine as a priming component of DNA prime and recombinant MVA boost vaccine. This effort culminated in a recent Phase I clinical trial of the ADVAX DNA vaccine. Although DNA immunization is a promising vaccine strategy, inoculation with antigen-encoding DNA has generally provided limited immunogenicity in non-human primate models and in human clinical trials. As a result, we are currently pursuing strategies to augment the magnitude and enhance the quality of the immune response to DNA vaccines. Our approach centers on novel DNA constructs that facilitate antigen (Ag) cross-presentation by dendritic cells (DC) in conjunction with the use of cutting edge delivery technologies.

Induction of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies (Nabs) with envelope-based immunogens
Our efforts to induce NAbs focus on the V3 loop of gp120. V3 loop based immunogens have historically been potent inducers of strain-specific NAbs, yet have been incapable of eliciting NAbs to heterologous primary isolates. This failure is in part explained by the vast sequence diversity among different primary isolates and the potential inaccessibility to Nabs. Focusing on V3 alone is therefore not a viable global vaccine strategy. Targeting the V3 loop may however be a pragmatic strategy to develop a prophylactic vaccine for HIV-1 in a geographically restricted area with limited sequence diversity. We are testing the hypothesis that coupling selected V3 immunogens to DC targeting vaccine platforms will enhance B cell maturation and yield high titer, high affinity NAbs against primary isolates of limited sequence divergence.

Novel IgG Fc and TLR5 ligand based vaccine platforms
We believe that a recombinant fusion vaccine incorporating both the Ag of interest and a APC/DC targeting moiety would have distinct advantages, including i) capability to target the Ag to DC, ii) coupling stimulation of DC maturation with Ag uptake, and iii) enhanced processing and ultimately presentation and co-stimulation. To this end, we are pursuing promising APC/DC targeting and activation strategies that focus on two pivotal immunologic interactions: Fc-Fc receptor and flagellin-TLR5. We are testing the hypothesis that novel Fc-based and flagellin-based platforms will engender robust and long-lasting immunity.